Commodore 64 Emulator downloads

The links below will give you access to download the d64 (disk image) files I created using Turbo Assembler.

Download asm2.d64.

Download asmsprites.d64.

Download Commodore 64 Learn Assembly Basics (word document).


Github - containing my YouTube downloads

Click on the image below to check out my Github page. You will be then able to download all of the programs I worked on in both Basic and Assembly language. c# loops

Twitter page for the Commodore 64

Here is a link to my Twitter page. I often include the latest uploads to projects and other things I am working on, such as this website. c# loops

Commodore 64 eBook on Game Design

c# loops

Oculus Rift Much

I came across this video on YouTube today for the Oculus Rift. It features a live 80's arcade that is about as nostalgic as you can get. Don't miss this experience. The Oculus Rift sells for about $600, but that should come down over time. One of the drawbacks to this machine is people experience motion sickness that is common to pilots in flight simulations.

You can actually experience the excitement of walking through a live arcade real time. This guy is proof of how fun it seems to be. He states it feels as if you are really there. I recall that Chuckie Cheese was a popular arcade in those days. I remember all of the colorful flashing lights. Anyway you have to see this video to believe it. Too bad it is overpriced, but it looks like we are in for a thrill of a lifetime! <>

Mattel Viewmaster in Virtual Reality

Mattel originally invented a slideshow masterpiece known as the Viewmaster. You would insert slides embedded with their Kodachrome color film. It contained a viewer that a person could look into and allow you to navigate through slides that created a 3D illusion of it's time. These were quite popular with children. More recently the company has contracted with Google and created a new View-Master that simulates a virtual reality environment, similiar to the Oculus Rift on a lower scale.

Adults react to View-Master

Here is an interesting video where adults who owned the viewmaster as a child are now able to experience the new virtual reality view-master that puts the user in a simulated 3D environment that provides an illusion to make it seem real.

Lazy Game Reviews

I came across this video recently which really provides a great overview of the Commodore 64 and the user's experience. Lazy Game Reviews explains the history, competition of other 8-bit systems of it's time, the various of C64 components that existed then, and a some great game reviews!

Commodore 64 Commercials

I am giving credit today for the amazing commercials that ruled in that decade! The music, graphics, and emotions depicted in these short broadcasts reached a massive audience. May the Commodore 64 nostalic fever never die and live in our hearts forever!

So the commerical asks us. "Are you keeping up with the Commodore? Because the Commodore is keeping up with you!!" The slogan made so much sense since the Commodore 64 was already dominating that generation and was the world's best selling computer in that era.

This was actually one of the first Commodore 64 commercials that had the most amazing synthesizer music. If I'm not mistaken it sounds like this was extracted from the POKEy chip itself right from the digit chip. Just listen to that incredible music. This example great exaggerated the competition and tried to compare against even the IBM computer of that generation. However I agree that the Commodore 64 was the most exhilirating computer anyone had possession of in those days.

I recall seeing the first system when my neighbor invited me over to his house one evening. I remember though that he procrastinated for the longest time and eventually let me come over. He was showing off Ghostbusters and the other games. Yet that moment lives in my mind forever. It was then that I was seeing multicolor graphics in a way never produced before. He also showed me Basic, but failed to understand the importance of computer programming. I recall him playing with syntax error messages, but never trying to write a program. Oh well, we all have our defined passions. Mine was the moment he was generous enough to show me a world I have never witnessed before.

Jim Butterfield

Let's take a moment and give credit to the man who helped us understand our Commodore 64 computers in a fun way. I remember reading so many articles about Jim Butterfield and the legend he created. Such a genius he was and will never be forgotten. He has the ability to extract things so someone can learn at an elementary level. I recall learning from many of his assembly language guides.

Computer Chronicles David Crane

This video introduces us to David Crane. He and his team founded the gaming company Activision around 1979 when they were booted from Atari. Crane and several other Atari employees at the time were deemed no better than anyone else. They were also told by Atari officials that "anyone could design a game cartridge". Activision was famous for creating specialized chips to expand the capabilities of their games. Some of the popular titles include Outlaw, Fishing Derby, Grand Prix, Pitfall, Ghostbusters (seen here), and many others.

Author's note: If you have really ever studied the design of Commodore 64 games from a lower level (in machine language) then you will have such a high appreciation for the engineers that were nothing such as "genius". In my experience with development of assembly language I have found it to be extremely complex and overwhelming. These software engineers, such as David Crane were ahead of their time. We should be grateful for their hard work, which eventually paved the way for more advanced, graphical, simulator-type games.

Commodore 64 Cauldron

One of the most popular games for that era was Cauldron I and Cauldron II. This game consisted of controlling a witch or pumpkin (depending on which game you played). The missions were different for each. The fun part or the replay value was the challenge is trying to navigate through all the screens without getting killed. There were all various types of monsters and insects that stood in your way to make the game interesting. The music alone was very nice to listen to and set the mood for the gameplay. There was even a witch cackle (laugh) that occured when your player died.

Weird Paul and the Commodore 64

I got quite a kick out of this Youtuber and his Commodore 64 nostalgia. The part where he is staring at the motionless sprite is priceless. He certainly has a unqiue way of presenting his content.

He actually has saved years of videos from a camcorder taken by his father. If anyone has treasures in his closet, it would certainly have to be Wierd Paul. Gotta love this guy!

Metal Jesus

Watch Metal Jesus review the Commodore 64. I always liked this guy and besides he can play some cool guitar riffs. So in comparison of the Ipad vs. the Commodore 64, if I wanted to write a good program I would choose the Commodore 64 anyday over Apple. Sorry Steve Jobs.

Commodore 64 The Final Cartridge III

Below is a picture of the Final Cartridge III for the Commodore 64. Introduced in 1987 it plugged into the expansion port and provided 60 new functions for the Commodore 64 programmer. It also featured a built in fast loader to speed up game loading time and had graphics user interface that communicated directly with the hardware of your system. This allowed you the ability to freeze a game in progress, disabled sprite collision detection, and even reset to Basic so you can disassemble the code.

Below is a picture of the Final Cartridge III for the Commodore 64. Introduced in 1987 it plugged into the expansion port and provided 60 new functions for the Commodore 64 programmer. It also featured a built in fast loader to speed up game loading time and had graphics user interface that communicated directly with the hardware of your system. This allowed you the ability to freeze a game in progress, disabled sprite collision detection, and even reset to Basic so you can disassemble the code.

I actually used this to disassemble the game Pitfall II and posted a live video on that demonstration. You can view it below. Hacking was fun to do like this back in the days. The Final Cartridge also provided the ability to copy bytes of memory that could be saved to disk. I actually copied several ROM game copies from a friend back in 1990 since I didn't own the original version. It was my first experience with piracy! Actually it didn't exactly exist in that generation until much later. Then Commodore 64 developers start creating disk protection programs to protect their code from prying eyes. Oh such were the days!

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